Available on Demand | November 17, 2021 | 1 CPE

The U.S. military maintains bases in more than 70 countries and territories around the world, some of them in inhospitable or hard-to-reach areas. When a piece of equipment fails – whether a weapon, a radar dish, or something more prosaic like a mess hall stove – getting replacement parts can be difficult and time-consuming, and the delay can cause anything from mild inconvenience to serious problems meeting the mission.

Larger bases may have maintenance machine shops, where skilled machine tool operators can spend hours carving replacement parts out of blocks of metal (subtractive manufacturing). This often causes a backlog in part throughput via this limited resource.

A new class of 3-D printers that uses polymers and metals to build strong replacement parts – additive manufacturing – is revolutionizing the supply chain, and can be networked together, providing new readiness capabilities among far-flung installations.

Featured Speakers:

Megan Kreiger, Mechanical Engineer, U.S. Army Engineer Research & Development Center (ERDC), Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL)
Megan Kreiger
Mechanical Engineer, U.S. Army Engineer Research & Development Center (ERDC), Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL)
James Zunino, Senior Scientific Technical Manager for Munitions Future Concepts and S&T, Army Technical Area Chief (TAC-1), Advanced Materials & Manufacturing, U.S. Army Futures Command, DEVCOM
James L. Zunino III
Senior Scientific Technical Manager, Munitions Future Concepts and S&T, Army Technical Area Chief (TAC-1), Advanced Materials & Manufacturing, U.S. Army Futures Command, DEVCOM
Tony Higgins, Federal Leader, Markforged
Tony Higgins
Federal Leader,
Markforged
John Breeden (Moderator) Contributing Editor, FedInsider
John Breeden (moderator)
Contributing Editor,
FedInsider
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